Sunday, January 30, 2011

Kale Chips Itty Bitty Style


I believe the secret to perfect kale chips is a low oven temperature, about 250 degrees. Too hot and they tend to burn. I also use insulated baking sheets, which hold even heat. With regular pans, try parchment paper.

Usually I stick with olive oil and salt, but today I experimented with my seasoning. I whipped up a concoction of olive oil (3 Tbsp.), ume plum vinegar (1-1.5 Tbsp.), and soy sauce (1-1.5 Tbsp.). After de-stemming and drying the rinsed kale, I brushed the mixture on the leaves and placed them in a single layer on the pan. Using a brush prevents too much of anything globbing up in one area. I then popped them in the 250 oven for about 30 minutes. I checked them a couple times to make sure they were fully crisp - leathery kale chips are not what we are going for. They came out perfect and oh so delicious. A real hit with the kiddo to boot. This could be the trick you've been looking for to get your child to eat their greens.

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

9 comments:

  1. I can't wait to try this. Yumm.

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  2. I've been making these all winter, ever since you mentioned them and gave me the "recipe". We've been experimenting with pepper flakes, garlic salt, sea salt and sesame seeds. They have all been a hit and the kids each them (2 sheets full) right out of the oven. Thanks for sharing!

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  3. I have learned to love kale chips. To be honest I haven't figured out any other way to eat them. LOL

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  4. oh i've got some good recipes for kale haters :)

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  5. thanks for posting your recipe! funny how it was exactly what i was looking for.

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  6. I usually dehydrate both kale and Swiss chard and sneak the flakes into unsuspecting food places throughout the winter. The kids don't even ask anymore....they just eat!

    Thanks for sharing.
    Elizabeth

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  7. I've tried making kale chips several times over the past few weeks and keep screwing it up somehow (though I still eat them). Off to try your method right now!

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  8. And now I want to grow Kale. :) Thanks!!

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  9. I loved growing Cavolo nero (Tuscan Kale) this year, and it was such a great substitute as a dark leafy green for Chinese cooking. In Asia, there are a lot of chips made from fruit and vegetables so I'm going to love trying this! Jo Jo

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